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echo-hawk talks about the u.s. government's adoption of the u.n. declaration of the rights of indigenous peoples and discusses what needs to be done to implement it and create a more just society for native americans. this is about an hour 15. [applause] >> wow. [laughter] i have to thank you, professor. i couldn't ask for a more wonderful than and generous, kind introduction. i paid her to say all of that. [laughter] but i am very pleased to be here at asu's sandra day o'connor's college of law and appreciate the opportunity to speak. and i especially want to thank greg hill the executive director of the indian legal program, darlene and of course patty ferguson for inviting me to be here. i am just so pleased and glad and honored to once again be here at the college and to be part of this lecture series. i have to say at the outset that the program is certainly well known nationally. as a national leader in education and the field of federal indian law. over the years i have very much valued my opportunity to work with the esteemed professor here in various matters. the p
light to drill for oil. >> the u.n. says the long drawn out battle between government troops and rebels in the democratic republic of congo is drawing to a close. congolese soldiers are launching an assault to retake the last town held by armed fighters known as the m23 rebels. a bit of background. the m23 are a group of tute si fighters who defected from the government. the conflicts forced 800,000 people to flee their homes. the push by the congolese troops has been largely successful because they are backed by a u.n. prevention brigade sent to crush the rebels. the m23 fighters abandoned their military positions in the east and are confined to a small down close to the ugandan border called rumanagabo. >> they have been fighting hard for days. they are getting ready to fight again. they are congolese government troops and have taken a string of towns back from the m23 rebels. the fighters hold a town on the ugandan border, a few kilometres from here. the congolese tanks are getting ready for what the army says is a final push against the m23 rebels. the morale is high. they've had se
are the latest targets of data collection. now, world leaders are turning to the u.n. for help. the latest, just ahead. over the weekend, thousands gathered in d.c. to protest nsa spying. they want transparency and action. the sights and sounds of the "stop watching me" rally heating up. >> we will tell you why one photographer was added to the fbi database for simply snapping a few photos. that is coming up later in today's show. it's monday, october 28. i'm megan lopez in washington, d.c., and you are watching rt. spain has joined a growing list of u.s. allies demanding answers from the obama administration when it comes to spying. the spanish government summoned the ambassador to discuss allegations of collecting data on 60 million spanish telephones over one month this past december. using information leaked by nsa contractor edward snowden, a spanish newspaper reported the nsa collected numbers and locations of the phone calls, but not actual content. this after learning that the nsa has also been tuning into the communications up dirty five world leaders. now the european union parliamenta
production equipment, according to a report from the international chemical weapons watchdog. the u.n. is satisfied declared production - mixing and filling equipment - has been eliminated. live to istanbul. omar al saleh has more on this from istanbul. this coming ahead of a deadline set by the u.n. >> yes, that's true. basically it says that syria did need that deadline. now the opcw said that its inspectors visited 21 sites out of the 23 sites declared by syria. it said the other two sites were too dangerous to visit, but they were confident and satisfied with the removal of the equipment and it was brought to the inspectors and they oversaw the destruction of aerial bombs, war heads, as well as all the mixing and filling equipment. now this brings us to the end of phase one, and two, which was meant to end by november 1st. after november 1st it will be the start of the more important phase and it's phase 3. that phase will last until the end of june next year and involves the u.n. mission support to monitor, verify all the destruction complex weapons which is estimated to be aroun
before fighting in the democratic republic of congo killed a u.n. peace keeper. the congolese army says it's taken over a number of towns from the m23. the rebels retreated to the rwandan border. they have threatened to pull out of peace talks in you ganda. >> three people have been killed in china's tiananmen square. a car crashed into pedestrians and into the crowd. several people, including a police officer, have been injured. the square has been evacuated. >> at least 21, 2.1 million syrian refugees in neighbouring countries are registered with the u.n. or awaiting registration. in syria the arabic groups are to arrive in damascus for talks, to meet the president and foreign minister. lakhdar brahimi is trying to build support for peace talks planned for geneva next month. the main rebel groups refused to take part. >> lakhdar brahimi's visit to damascus is part of a regional tour. he's visited iraq, egypt, kuwait, imam and kata and met the king of jordan in a country that hosts over half a million syrian refugees. on thursday he held talks with leaders of the free syrian army and o
of shooting hostages. we get the army's response to the allegations. >>> al jazerra obtains the first u.n. report on the destruction of syria's chemical weapons. we'll tell you what's in it. >> reporter: and i'll be reporting on how swarms of locust have eaten crops across 70% of madagascar and a new plan to kill them. ♪ ♪ >>> u.s. press barack obama has ordered a review of the national security agency intelligence operations acknowledge that go more constraints are needing. obama is being fiercely criticized over allegations the national security agency tapped german chancellor angela merkel's phone and snoop odd other european allies. white house spokesman jay karen said it would look to to the concerns of other country. here are the details. >> reporter: at the white house, the presidential spokesman refused to be drawn on the reports that the u.s. tracked millions of spanish foal calls but reported the nsa surveillance programs are being examined. >> we are conducting a review. we are mindful that some of these disclosure have his caused tension in our relationships. with new capa
and the chemical programs and how it plans to destroy it on time to the u.n. inspectors, so on one hand the syrian government feels at the moment we are satisfying the international community mainly the u.s. and russia and on the other side maybe at this particular moment we can still hold some ground. >> reporter: thanks for joining us from beirut. international inspectors completed the first phase of the mission to destroy syria's chemical weapons and say the government submitted a detailed plan to eliminate the stockpile. damascus allowed access to site and the plan is to destroy chemical weapons by the middle of next year. an explosion of gaza after an air strike and no injuries reported and israel said it targeted two hidden rocket launchers and it's a response of rockets fired from gaza early monday. early results in the presidential election said the ally and prime minister is headed for a big win and he has more than 62% of the votes and 90% counted and we report. >> celebrations to mark the end of aer roo and be be -- beginning of a new style of government in georgia and he will take the
-term elections killing off hopes of a third term. [gunfire] emergency talks with the u.n. after renewed fighting between government forces and m 23 rebels in the eastern democratic part of congo. they pray for a return home 65 years after being forced out. ♪ the u.n. arab league arrived for talks with the syrian government planned in geneva next month and he has been touring the region in the past week talking to all sides involved in the conflict and been to countries that support it like turkey and kanta and talks with groups against fighting with the government and met iran's new president who is a supporter in the region telling him the country's presence is vital for the geneva talks to succeed. and let's bring bill joining us live from beirut and i understand he drove from beirut to damascus and he is there, what is he going to do? >> well, he is due to meet with the syrian president bashir assad and foreign minister and this will be a very difficult mission, as difficult as it was in the past simply because the positions on either side have not changed much. the opposition still says it
targeted for several high profile hacking attempts in the united states. >>> u.n. inspectors missed an important deadline in dismantling syria's quepts program, they were unable to reach two of the 23 locations because of security reasons. they are currently destroying equipment used to manufacture the weapons. the inspectors didn't say exactly the if syrian rebels or the government were responsible, just that they are still negotiating access. the syrian government has agreed to destroy or remove its entire stockpile by 2014. the first report contains new details about the extent of the country's chemical weapons program based on information the syrian government provided to the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons. syria says it has 24 facilities at 23 locations around the country. 2.3 million pounds, 230 unfilled chemical bombs in stork storming. syria has agreed to remove all of this by mid 2014, william butler is a former weapons inspector in iraq. ambassador good to see you. >> good to see you john. >> you've read this report, what stands out to you? >> what st
. congo and the u.n. have consistently accused rwanda and uganda of supporting the rebels, although both of those countries deny it. in the recent days in the fighting when the m 23, it looks like they haven't been getting much support at all because the congolese army has just taken one town after the next. it was originally quite some heavy fighting, but it looks like the m 23 just got weaker and weaker. as we move forward today with government soldiers several times we came under fire but it was only fire of light weapons and m 23 was armed to the teeth with mortars and rockets. today they didn't have any of those kinds of weapons left, it seems. just some rifles and machine guns. >> to syria now where the red cross has brokered a deal to allow some people to leave a besieged suburb. the area is surrounded by government forces and thousands face starvation. the u.n. said there are still a million people trapped without aid across the country. >> reporter: this is a rare movement of relief and cooperation between regime forces, rebel groups and aid workers. some 1800 syrians have been
program reauthorised. james b. comey is the 7th director of the federal bureau of investigation. >> the u.n.'s special envoy to syria is in damascus on his latest round of diplomacy, trying to bring together all sides in the conflict to peace talks in geneva. rob matheson has the story. >> many called it a near impossible task - a return to damascus to muster some or, indeed, any enthusiasm for talks finding a way out of syria's crisis. it's not just a matter of getting two sides to the table. before that he has to try to knit together a fractured rebel opposition - much of which doesn't want to be involved. >> translation: the international community wants to support the syrian regime in geneva, they don't want to weaken them. that's why we reject the conference. when we see promises toppling the assad reej aim leading to an -- regime leading to an international court, then yes we will negotiate it. first there needs to be a statement. in the absence of political solution the military solution is the only one on the table. >> elsewhere in syria the deadline for destroying equipment used t
continues. . >>> welcome back, you are watching al jazeera. the top stories: the u.n. says a threat from the m23 movement in the democratic republic of congo is almost over. government troops are trying to retake the last town in the east of the country that is held by rebels. >> another senior leader of the muslim brotherhood has been arrested in egypt. an interior ministerry source says esam el-arian was taken from a house in a cairo suburb where he'd been hiding >> a bus crashed and doubt fire between bangalore and hyderabad in india. 44 dead, six passengers and the driver made it out alive. >> at the u.n. backed khmer rouge trial in cam bodia, it's in the final stages of a trial of the two most senior leaders arrived. the men are accused of crimes against humanity. the court is looking into the removal of people from the capital 40 years ago. let's go to al jazeera's correspondent following the trial in pyongyang. what has been happening in court today? >> well, this is a second-last day of final statements from both sides, we heard from prosecution lawyers and lawyers for the civil
the u.n. arrob league tells the opposition they have to attend a peace conference. ♪ hello, i'm adrian and this is al jazeera live from doha and a power crisis in gaza as the territory runs out of fuel, the search for millions of missing people around the world and the discovery of what could be the largest masked grave from the bosnian war. >> get off my driveway. >> the mayor of the city under pressure under a crack smoking video. ♪ in the past couple hours the u.n. arab league told the opposition what it must attend peace talks in switzerland and they are trying to build a framework for negotiations to end the fighting and involving rebel fighters and politicians is difficult and the comments are a day after reports of an israeli air strike on a weapons basin side syria. >> i'm going to meet representatives from russia and the united states in what we call the tri-lateral and we have been working together for quite some time now. and i think that probably in the afternoon or the second day, the representatives of the rest of the p 5 will join us and other countries. there
's largest u.n. peacekeeping forces in congo have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. has not managed to stop atrocities in the 14 years it's been here, but will find out what happened. >> we all know that bodies have been found in the area. the area has been controlled by m23 for a year, and it has been taken by the army a few days ago. on the u.n. side we form a team which will investigate. from the results we'll tell you what was discovered. >> the government says it's investigating too. but war crimes are common in congo's conflict. the full story may never beuncovered. >>> two men have been sentenced to death in absentia for war crimes committed during bangladesh's war of independence. they've been found guilty by a tribunal for the murder of a dozen intellectuals in 1971. one of the mean, chowdhury mueen-uddin, is a prominent muslim leader living in the u.k. he fled after the 9-month war. the other defendant, ashrafuz zaman khan lives in the united states. joining us from london via skype is a man whose father was abducted and killed during the 1971 war. thank you fo
peacekeeping forces have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. has not managed to stop atrocities. they'll find out what happened. >> translation: we know that bodies have been found in the area. it has been controlled by the m23 for one year, and he has been taken by the army a few days ago. >> on the u.n. side we are forming a team. from the results we'll tell you what we discovered. >> the government says it's investigating too. war crimes are common in congo's conflict. the full story may never be uncovered. . >>> in northern yemen more heavy fighting a being reported as shia muslim rebels attack a stronghold. a tribal leader says 100 people have been killed in fighting around damaj. ambulances can't get to the town to treat civilian casualties. we have this report from sanneh. >> this is the only video we have of the latest fighting in the town of damaj. it's a stronghold for muslim conservatives - the salafi. they have been shelled by shia houthi rebels. the houthi say it's home to religious conservative parties. >> translation: these are foreign extreme its who consider us
, by not takingun of the non-permanent seat did on the u.n. security council. and, two, by deciding to not take part in certain diplomatic and military operations with the u.s. where these things would normally happen otherwise. so this is a chance for saudis to express concerns to kerry, not just about syria but also about iran. the saudis are very concerned about the iranians trying to assume a greater role in regional politics, and it doesn't want to be pushed out. so kerry has to go with listening to these concerns, trying to placate the saudis as best he can. >>> in syria, government forces tried to quell much government controlled areas. assad's regime has tried to secure that area from months. video shows thick smoke. al jazeera cannot verify these videos. more than 100,000 people have been killed since that war began two and a half years ago. >>> meanwhile, another area of syria, a giant bronze statue of jesus has managed to end the violence, albeit briefly. government forces and reynolds stopped fighting for three days so the 40 foot statute could be erected. a london based foundation has b
're covering in detail in the next 60 minutes. the u.n.-syrian envoy arrives in damascus. >>> argentina's president loses ground midterm elections killing off her hopes of a third term in office. >>> demanding answers and e.u. delegation heads to washington on claims that the u.s. spied on leaders. >>> no planes, trains or angels. the crippling the u.s. transport system. >> we begin with syria and this number. 2,100,000. that is the total number of people, individuals, that the u.n.est hates has now fled syria because of war. that's on top of the 5 million who have been displaced but still within syria's borders. well, that figure comes as the latest diplomacies as they try tto drum up another round of talks. we're live from neighboring beirut. take us through what they're hoping to achieve. all right, i don't know if you can hear me. i hope you can. now in da mas damascus. what do me hope to achieve. >> reporter: more than anything he wants to hear from the syrian government what it would take for the syrian government to attend a geneva conference. he has been shuffling around the reg
say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sites. the head of the opcw u.n. team said that the country has been cooperative. >> we have had good meetings with the syrian government, there's continued strong cooperation with the secretary-general and the director of opcw. we build on this. we have one shared goal - the elimination of the program, which is of benefit to all and the syrian people. >> not all are convinced, as evidenced on abc's "this week", in syria the chemical weapons are catalogued, inspectors are in there finding and putting a stop to the program. >> we'll see. i'm a sceptic, like a lot of others are. i know friends in the region are worried. >> syria is believed to possess around 1,000 met rig tonnes of chemical weapons, including mustard gas and sarin, which they denied for years. they deny any involvement in the august 21st chemical weapons attack that killed 1,400 people there. under threat of u.s. military action rush abrokered a deal with the united states for sir why to destroy their stockpiles. it is complicated and it's not decided how or whe
, the nerve agent, and mustard gas. the interesting bit of this is that the u.n. or the opcw have no mandate to carry out the destruction and, therefore, it's highly probable that a u.n. member state will have to provide technical and operational assistance in destroying that. >> that being the case, there's always been this concern that the opcw won't be able to meet the deadlines to destroy all the chemical weapons. given that they have met this deadline, are they optimistic to meet the next few deadlines? >> yes, well, when you spoke to the officials from the opcw, they will say they are very optimistic about the phase that is completed - 1 and 2. if you remember the secretary-general of the united nations, when he was outlining the whole plan for the joint u.n.-opcw, he said the most challenging part is phase 3. that is the coming phase, if you will - destroying the stockpile. we have to remember all of this is based on what the syrian government declared. now, we don't know if the opcw has its own information that contradicts what syria declared - that's one. and probably there will be
to a recent u.n. report, in the two years of conflict syria has lost 35 years of human development progress. with the two million refugees, this is a national crisis that has become a regional crisis putting serious strains on the neighboring countries. behind these jarring statistics is the real toll on the syrian people, the kids who haven't gone to school for two years, the women who have endured rape and abuse and the 5 million internally displaced syrians who don't have a place to live or enough to eat. as the crisis has escalated, we have accelerated our humanitarian response. our assistance is now reaching about 4.2 million people inside syria and we're helping to support 2 million refugees. but the same stubborn challenges that i talked about seven months ago, access, security and resources continue to prevent us and others from reaching everybody who needs help to get it and things continue to escalate. in early october, fueled by the political momentum of the security council's resolution to eliminate the chemical weapons, the u.n. security council unanimously passed a presidentia
documents about the n.s.a., including information that the u.s. has spied on allies. if he returns to the u.s. he faces charges of espionage. he is in russia where he was granted asylum. >> a gunman involved in the killing at los angeles international airport talked to police. he told them he acted alone, the admission coming after he was shot by officers. he killed a t.s.a. employee and injured three others. the 23-year-old is facing murder charges and the death penalty. he's in critical condition and under 24 hour armed surveillance. >> an alabama airport is being reopened after a bomb threat. officials at birmingham-shuttlesworth international airport say they found a note warning of a pom in the main terminal -- of a bomb in the main terminal and called the federal bureau of investigation. after a sweep the airport was cleared. it was up and running two hours later. a dozen flight were delayed or diverted. passengers were briefly evacuated during the shutdown. >> while colder air is coming out of canada, into the united states we have wet, warm weather coming up into texas from the sout
the ban ki-moon example was interesting. thank you men, the secretary- general to the u.n., very -- bany to the u.s. -- a ki-moon, secretary-general to the u.n., very frilly to the u.s., he was coming april to the white house for a routine meeting with president obama. nsa collected his talking points before the meeting. now the white house won't say whether president obama was given and read this talking point in advance of the meeting, but if you think about it, it is kind of hard to imagine those talking points would contain anything terribly shocking. of course, there is the political cost of being caught essentially eavesdropping on the secretary-general of the u.n. that cost has been paid. i think as long as they could remain secret about all of this stuff, nsa's instinct was to collect everything and whoever in the government wants to read it, fine, if not, fine. but now i think the administration is a very difficult decision to make about balancing the political cost of spying, particularly on allies, on friendly countries, frilly -- friendlynst people, against what they might gl
a video said to show him smoking crack cocaine. >> joining us for a developing story out of syria, where u.n. arab league lakhdar brahimi has been speaking. he has been talking about efforts to end the war there, and plans for a conference in geneva. >> i am going meet representatives from russia and united states, our partners in the trilateral format - we have been working together for quite some time now. i think probably in the afternoon or the second day representatives of the rest of the p5 will join us and maybe other countries. there are some very, very serious efforts being developed everywhere to try and make this conference possible. but, you know, we will say it's happened only when it happens. >> that was lakhdar brahimi speaking a few moments ago in damascus. let's get some comment from our correspondent hoda who is in lebanon. >> as lakhdar brahimi tries to get all parties to sign up to the geneva ii conference, he says the syrian people continue to suffer. as many as a third of them are directly caught up in the conflict. >> he said the solution was more urgents now than neve
france was listening to her calls in the late 1990s. she was at the u.n. when a french ambassador asked her about something she said during a private call with someone else. she said, "this is not a surprise, countries spy on each other." >> 60 are dead after a wave of bombings across iraq, striking shi item areas, and sold years in mosul. there were more than 10 blasts. the attacks were the latest in a surge of blasts, more than 5,000 this year. >> syria met a deadline as it works to remove chemical weapons arsenal, in line with an agreement to eliminate all weapons by mid-2014. kilmeny duchardt has more. >> syria is reportedly meeting an ambitious deadline set by the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons, otherwise known as opcw, to destroy lethal stockpiles by next year. syria handed over details of poison gas and nerve agent programs on thursday, ahead of the october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing the report, but the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapons' sites. the head. opcw un team said the country has been cooperative. >> we had good meetings with
as deputy attorney general in the bush administration. >>> u.n. envo arab league envoys trying to build support for peace talks next month. >>> nearly a year after super storm sandy ellis island opens. if you would like the latest on any of the stories in our bulletins we encourage you to head on over to our website at www.aljazeera.com. once again, www.aljazeera.com. tony harris. >> tonight on "inside story" the united states spies on friends, not just foes. is this the new business or usual or is it damaging american foreign policy. plus the influence of rock legend lou reed and his impact on the culture from the 60s to today. >> hello, i'm libby casey. tonight on inside story we'll take a walk on the wild side and look at the life and legacy of iconic rocker lou reed who died at the age of 71. first we'll focus on american spying, specifically spying on friends, and our friends are not happy. tonight you can add spain to the list of countries that are demanding answers. the newest details emerge in this spanish newspaper "el mundo" reporting that phone calls from surveye survei. over
as possible. and as quick as possible. >> the u.n. backed mayor in cam bodia is in the final stage of a trial of the two most senior leaders arrived. the two men are accused of war crimes. we go to phonm penh. >> a city of 2 million emptied in less than a day. it's normally busy streets quite. 17 april 1975 marked the start of a reign of terror for many cam bodians. that mark khmer rouge soldiers marched into the city as victors. the people of phonm penh welcomed them, happy that a 5-year civil war was over. hours later they were all ordered to leave for the country side. this man was lying in phonm penh at the time. >> we were told the americans were planning to bomb the city. the soldiers told us we'd return in a few days. >> he was forced to march for a week with his family. his 3-year-old son didn't survive the journey. like others, he died from disease and starvation. the khmer rouge was trying to create a rural utopia. the 4-year reign would kill intellectuals, teachers - anyone accused of being a spy. this was a french photographer in phonm penh the day it fell. he never imagined the e
again in two weeks in tehran. >>> members of a u.n. team studying human rights in north korea say they've heard testimony outlining gross violations. told a u.n. committee about evidence of systemic and serious abuse. more than 200 witnesses have testified in hearings since march. including people from south korea, japan, and britain. they described experiences of being tortured or imprisoned for their religious beliefs or just for having contact with foreign cultures. the panel's chairman quoted the mother of a japanese girl abducted by north korean agents. >> tell us where our daughter is. is she alive? is she happy? is she dead? >> a north korean representative said it is a political plot launch by the country's enemies. they plan to submit their final report in march. >>> japan's industrial output rose in september marking the first increase in two months. that was due to higher production of transport equipment and electronic parts. industry ministry officials said output rose 1.5% from the previous month. order production increased as many new cars were sold in japan, demand for
community for relief. the u.n. held a news conference in manila on friday. officials called for about $47 million in emergency international assistance. authorities say more than 200 people died in the magnitude 7.2 quake, which had its epicenter on bohol island. a u.n. team on the ground says more than 52,000 buildings collapsed and they say 344,300 people remain evacuated. the united nations says there's an urgent need for more shelters and relief supplies such as food, water and medicine. >>> thailand, one of the world's welcomes about 20 million overseas visitors annually but tourist safety in the land of smiles has increasingly become issue, and that's led several foreign governments to call for action. they have set up the tourist's court in a bid to protect visitors. nhk world has more. >> reporter: pattaya is a popular beach resort 140 kilometers southeast of bangkok. the regional court in this bustling city added new work, handling complaints from foreign tourists. the court aims to settle claims before they leave thailand. officials say most of the cases should be settled within
beat people and arrest people and make them disappear. >> the world's largest u.n. peace-keeping forces in democratic republic of congo have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. hasn't managed to stop atrocities in the 14 years since it's been here. they'll find out what happened. >> we know that bodies have been found in that area. the area has been controlled by m23 for one year, and has been taken by the army a few days ago. we are quickly forming a team which is going to vet. from the results we'll tell you what was discovered. >> the government says it's investigating too. war crimes are common in congo's conflict. the full story may never be uncovered. >> a stampede in eastern nigeria left 17 people dead and dozens injured. it happened after an overnight church vigil. it's not known what caused the stampede. the state governor said an inquiry will investigate what happened. >> french ministers are holding a meeting in response to the murder of two french journalists killings mali's government has condemned the killings. >> in northern yemen more heavy fighting is being
. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. >> the head of the n.s.a. defiantly defending the spy agency. the general says gathering intelligence around the world is critical and helps to keep america safe from terrorists. >> the war raging in syria claiming some surprising new victims. children are being diagnosed with polio because they don't have access to adequate health care. >> it is reported that at 8:58 p.m., a huge object believing to be a meteor right fell on a farm. >> 75 years ago, martians innovated the planet or people listening to the radio thought they did. a look back at the war of the world broadcast that caused widespread panic across the country. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> good to have you with us on this wednesday. two hours from now, the health and human services secretary will testify. >> many are saying she should be fired. >> kathleen see bellous will be asked to explain the failure of the health care website. we have more on what she might say today. >> good morning. you know, kathl
it today. it's part of syria's agreement with the u.n. to destroy all chemical facilities and weapons by mid-2014. we'll have more on syria, later in the program. china demanded an explanation today after reports that u.s. and australian embassies are being used as hubs for electronic spying. an account in the "sydney morning herald" said the intelligence collection is happening across southeast asia. in beijing, a foreign ministry spokeswoman delivered her government's reaction. we demand they abide by international convention and don't engage in actions that hurt china's national security and interest. >> woodruff: separately, the union representing german journalists advised its members to stop using google and yahoo, after reports that u.s. and british intelligence have tapped their data centers. we'll have more on the ongoing storm over surveillance, right after the news summary. kenya struck back today at militants in somalia who attacked a shopping mall in nairobi last month. the kenyan military said warplanes bombed and destroyed a training camp used by the islamist group al-s
from the u.n. general assembly calling for right to privacy on the internet. a draft could be circulated later this week. i talked to al jazeera's national security advisory faisa patel. >> there is embarrassment right now, the socialist government is way, way down in the polls. so the notion that the french government has no control over its destiny that it can't protect itself even against american spying doesn't play well with the elect ral rat. >> faisa do they have a right to be outraged? >> i think so. you have to put this in the context of, parting of ways between europe and the united states, the drone issue being another one just last week, in the u.n. general assembly, there was a big debate about drones and there you had many european countries joining with third world countries to express concern about drones. i think there's also this general sense that maybe the americans have just gone too far in their quest for security and i think that's also part of the equation here. >> but when it comes to the spying how does that rank on the evils of the united states?
joins us from the u.n. help me sort through the issues. the chemical weapons inspectors finished the first phase of the job. what comes next? >> well, they did this ahead of schedule, they had a deadline for 1 november to stop all the production facilities of chemical weapons, and make it impossible for syria to produce any more chemical weapons. that has been done. i think the - those involved, the u.n. and the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons believe it really has been done, and they are happy. in many ways that is the easy part, tony. the more difficult part is all of those chemical weapons that they have. that is 1,000 metric tonnes of chemical weapons - war heads, munitio munitions, sarin, mustard gas - they have to find a way of getting the munitions and probably taking them out of syria and destroying them. the problem at the moment is they don't have a country that wants to do that job, that wants to host the deconstruction, destruction of the chemical weapons. >> so, james, look, we have a situation here - there was a lot of testimony on krill about s
reign down on the u.n. syria envoy says opposition and government must be represented at peace talks. first thailand's lower house part of the amnesty bill that may give the prime minister a way back and. >> can you get off my driveway? can you please get off my driveway? >> reporter: toronto mayor under pressure with a video showing him smoking crack cocaine. >> no reason to resign. ♪ we begin with an exclusive report from mali, a poor country in west africa that in the past year have seen fighters and rebels, right now in the capitol politicians are beginning talks on how to stabilize the north, but that maybe a vain hope and rebels tell us they will resume attacks on the army if it continues what it calls ethnic cleansing in an area they hope to turn into an independent state. our reporter mohamed went to meet them. >> it's a source of deep anger among the rebels. civilians crossing the border almost every week with wounds and stories of killing by the mali army. they tell al jazeera how they spent days in chains being beaten and verbally abused. they say soldiers arrested them
at the white house today. the meeting came on the heels of a u.n. report that said that nearly a thousand iraqis died during violence in october. let's go to mike viqueira at the white house, mike, tell us about that meeting today. what was the prime minister asking for? >> reporter: well, he's asking for weapons. he's asking for american weapons systems to fight the violence that he and the white house lay squarely at the feet of taliban. there are some who say no,al maliki is response as well involving the sunniy shiite and kurd violence. more than 7,000 iraqi versus died in violence over the course of this year alone, that's an estimated figure. al maliki asked for weapons systems to help. >> throughout this discussion the main theme was tha theme wai communicated to the prime minister that anything that we can do to help bring about that more hopeful future for iraq is something that we want to work on. welcome, mr. prime minister, thank you so much for coming. >> the white house saying again today which should be clear to everyone there is going to be no more american troops on the g
of a seat on the u.n. security council. but what everyone thinks of the obama administration's handling of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world t
people for nothing and arrest people and make them disappear. >> the world's largest u.n. peacekeeping forces - they have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. hasn't managed to stop atrocities in the 14 years since it's been here, but will find out what happened. >> translation: we know that bodies have been found in the area. the area had been controlled by m23 and has been taken by the army a few days ago. on the u.n. side we are forming a team that will investigate. from the results we'll tell you what we discovered. >> the government says it's investigating, but war crimes are common. the full story may not be uncovered. >> the suspect in friday's shooting at los angeles international airport was able to answer critical questions after he was shot. law enforcement officials said paul ciancia said a friend dropped him at the airport, but he acted alone. paul ciancia killed a t.s.a. employee and four others. >> older americans are against proposals that would cut social security benefits. 60% of americans 50 and older do not want the government to change how it determines
keeping the u.s.a. safe. >> that might be the way that the n.s.a. has skirted around these issues, because they are in lock step with g.c.h.q. they worked well in hand, the two of them. there are an awful lot of monitoring stations here in the u.k., one run by the n.s.a. itself up in yorkshire. it's said to be the largest facility in minwith hill, the largest in europe. the g.c.h.q. and n.s.a. work hand-in-glove together and have a special relationship and share intelligence, so maybe it's not the n.s.a. monitoring american citizens, maybe it's the g.c.h.q. and they can do it under british law, so a little bit of a roundabout way of doing things, phil. >> again, phil ittner joining us from london on these exclusive documents obtained by aljazeera. >> edward snowden has a new job, his lawyer said he has found a tech support job. he has been living in the former soviet republic since august. the lawyer didn't name the company. he is set to start tomorrow. >> if you're getting one of these letters, just shop around in the new marketplace. you're going to get a better deal. >> president obama
, and for the united states trying to figure out would it get the vote in the counsel, would it have the u.n. backing and legitimacy. so you were trying in that context to remember what all the members who would influence the security council were thinking, what they would be likely to do when the case was presented. >> and a vocal supporter of president bush at the time were they looking at the process and you can't help but over things like economy, strategy. >> some things come up in particular that friends don't spy on friends. use of intelligence is about understanding the world, and things that might happen in another country that would profoundly effect your own. if i'm a senior european official i might want to know what is going on in greece. the future of the european union as europeans know it depends on whether greece follows its austerity plan. the leaders will tell you that but not necessarily all. think about what has happened in the united states over the past 30 days. the whole debt crisis and many european leaders or other world leaders is saying is the united states going to drive
's director is denying the allegations. a diplomatic push is underway to end the war in syria. a u.n. special representative meets with ser vinnie president in an attempt to get him to participate in peace talks. >>> the red sox are world champions. >> for the first time in more than 90 years the boston red sox win the world series in front of the hometown faithful at fenway. ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to al jazerra america, i am stephanie sy. nearly a month after the roll out the government's health care website is still causing headaches for people who are unable to sign up for coverage. president obama is on the defensive and his health secretary has apologized, mike sresreuviqueira is in washingtoh the story. >> reporter: the website launch was called a did he back the. but the president went on offense defending the new health care law and drawing parallels with another high-profile launch that had its share of problems. before there was obama care, there was romney care. the massachusetts law that was a model for the affordable care act, visiting boston, president obama says the comparison sti
threatened to veto any resolution authorizing force at the u.n. security council, military action seemed any further off. >> the security council has to be brought in. >> reporter: stepping back a bit. obama decided to ask congress to approve the use of military force against syria. but that plan changed when, in september, u.s. secretary of state john kerry made an off the cuff comment saying if syria gave up its chemical weapons then military action could be avoided. something the russians jumped at and that led to a plan to eliminate syria's chemical weapons. based on that agreement, the global chemical weapons watchdog set deadlines for syria's disarmer. and sent weapons inspectors in. syria has now met two deadlines in that process. last week the syrian government submitted a plan outlining how it will destroy its chemical weapons reserves. on thursday, a day before the deadline, it's a announced that syria has functionally destroyed the equipment it needs to create new chemical weapons. the next deadline is the middle of this month with syria's formal plan will need to be approved by t
on destroying and dismantling the chemical weapons infrastructure supplied. today the u.n. confirms it has destroyed equipment syria used to make chemical weapons with. so far inspectors have visited 21 chemical sites identified by syrian authorities within the timeframe specified. the two remaining sites are in contested areas where the challenge of getting there is more difficult, but i hope ultimately can be succeeded at as well. let me conclude by saying i want to make clear my views at the outset, the united states cannot and should not be the key that resolves every dispute in this egion, but we have a very real strategic stake in this region to make sure that syria does not become a failed state. we need to increase our humanitarian assistance and insist on humanitarian access as well as increase our support communities hosting syrian refugees in lebanon and jordan and to getting others in the international community to live up to their responsibilities in this regard. calling on donor nations to join us in this time of greatest need, because syria is a global problem. we need an an
me on twitter @bonnieerbe. from pregnancy to sexism. a new ad campaign launched this week by u.n. women reveals that despite decades of global advancement, sexism and discrimination against women is still rampant worldwide. u.n. women hired an ad agency to conduct google searches on phrases such as "women should" and "women can't." the search engine's autocomplete function generated phrases such as "women should be slaves," "should not work", "cannot drive" and need to be controlled. the ads display the most popular responses over the mouths of women, showing in graphic form how women are silenced by gender bias. the united nations organization's officials believe this is proof it needs to continue making the case. for gender empowerment and equality. so marjorie clifton what about this campaign, do you think it's a good idea? >> i think it's very telling what bing and google and other great search engines allow removing the human hand to sort of see in a very analytical way what humans and what people are actually doing online without having intervention. what we're seeing is th
a crucial deadline. >> the next deadline is just a few weeks away. a former u.n. weapons investigator tells us about the challenges facing the syrian team. >> the vatican sends out a worldwide survey, catholic bishops polled on issues such as bird control and gay marriage. >> salmon are booming in numbers that haven't been seen in a century. how people have stepped in to help this once-threatened species. >> shock in the nfl's thursday night football game. the locally dolphins managed to upend the division leader, all up next in sports. (vo) tonight ... >> does the nsa collect any type of data on millions of americans? >> no sir. (vo) fault lines investigates what it's like to live under the watchful eye of the nsa. >> they know everything that you do, everything that you think, everything that you fear. they know how to manipulate and control you. the state has all the power. >> we have done more to destroy our way of life than the terrorists could ever have done. >> a senator under investigation and only al jazeera america is there. uncovering the corruption opening the files... >> are yo
are on the u.n. sanctions list. those who surrendered said they don't want to fight any more and they wanting to back to civilian life or join the congolese army. but it seems that they may be willing to sign a deal that gives any kind of amnesty to the leaders. >> malcolm webb reporting from the congo military base. >>> closing migrant camps, the government decided to do so after 92 people died of thirst trying to cross the sahara desert. officials also promise to severely punish the traffickers who move people through to m nir or libya. >>> in an interview recorded a few weeks, al jazeera has obtained a copy of the recording that was never made public. egypt's constitution was suspended after the president mohammed morsi was deposed. >> the military institution should be given immunity for the role it has played. it is not an immune for fatah, it is for the institution. and the coming constitution should consider that. the institution should be protected in the constitution for the next 15 years with standing who is going to be in power whether he's islamist. >> a satire show pulled off the
referred to the use of chemical weapons in syria as a redline. he used obama's own words. the u.n. secretary general, jeff feldman, the highest ranking american at the united nations in the former assistant secretary for eastern affair and ambassador to lebanon was in iran in august talking to them prior to the u.s.-russia deal as things were being worked out. these things were being discussed. i interviewed foreign minister when he was in new york, and basically the headline was we have a history of use of chemical weapons. we have destroyed chemical weapons. we can help in the process. they sported the process all along. in fact a deputy foreign minister was in moscow when the agreement was announced. an interesting coincidence. them willing to help was in the process. while we're on the subject of syria. one of our writers, jeffrey aaronsohn said something fascinating about syria in a recent article. he said syria is the arena or where the basic prerequisite for progress on the u.s.-iran agenda recognizing core interests and facing mechanisms to safe guard them are being forged
to an . they have made their pleasure known. one by not taking one of the permanent seats on the u.n. security council and deciding not to take part in certain diplomatic and military operations with the u.s. where these things would happen otherwise. this is a chance for the saudis to express their concerns to kerry not just about syria, but also about iran. the saudis are concerned about iranians assuming a greater role in politics. kerry has to listen to these concerns and try to placate the saudis the best he can. >> the first time since egyptian president morsi was doug deposed pictures of him emerge. they are believed to have been filmed secretly in july. >> morsi is to stand trial in a few hours about murder and violence. >> it means a strike against the constitution, this issue violates all of the basics of state institutions. >> we are in cairo with more on that. the egyptian newspapers editor says this was the first of many clips to be ro research releasee coming days. more citmorsi's trial starts ony and the following days. in these clips we believe he will talk about all sorts of m
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